Loading...

Excerpt

Table of Contents

Introduction

Differences between Individual and Couples/Family Therapy

Deciding and Addressing Treatment Goals for Individual & Couples Therapies

Ethical Implications of Individual and Couples Therapists Collaboration

Identifying Who the Client Is For a Marital and Family Counsellor

Conclusion

References

Introduction

Accordingly, the patterns of behaviour of families have been observed to influence the individual, thus, may need to be a part of the treatment. In both marriage and family therapy, research has it that the unit of treatment is not only the individual, even if the interview is on a single person, but also remains to be the set of relationships imbedding the person. In short, marriage and family therapy refers to a brief solution-focused specific that contain attainable therapeutic goals, designed with the so termed the ‘end in mind’. Family and marriage therapists have the ability of treating a number of sombre clinical problems. The goal of family therapy is to bring change not only in an individual, but also in the structure of the family and the sequences of behaviour among its members. As it will be noted, this paper analyses the major differences between individual therapy and couples therapy, discuss how treatment goals are decided and addressed for these two therapies, the ethical implications evident along with identifying the patient/or client for a marital and family counsellor.

Differences between Individual and Couples/Family Therapy

Since the term ‘Therapy’ is very broad as it uses various styles and treatment modes, it can be confusing because of its types on top of its nature of using diverse techniques, approaches and even theories. However, the basic structural difference between individual and couple therapy work remains clear (Kawar et al, 2018). For instance, in individual therapy, the main focus is noted to be on the development of a one-to-one relationship or interview with the therapist. Notably, this relationship assumes several facets depending on the therapist’s approach, but in most cases it involves the creation of a conducive environment on top of the application of techniques in reducing symptoms and individual development. In this sense, the person remains engaged in a process of self-reliance on his or her behaviours as well as emotions (Sexton & Lebow, 2015).

On the other side, couples therapy entails a major focus on enhancing the pattern of communication within the couple. Unlike the aforementioned individual therapy, this type involves direct entering by the therapist to the way of life of the couples (Wetchler & Hecker, 2014). The couples are observed to bring their routines and habits directly with each other into the counselling session. Again, the therapist is engaged in analysing as well as giving feedback concerning the interactions of the couple, and he/she has to give suggestions on the ways of improving this. In contrast to the individual therapy, couples therapy is more intensive since the couples are usually asked to co-create the change process.

Deciding and Addressing Treatment Goals for Individual & Couples Therapies

The definitive objective of psychotherapy is helping patients/clients address on top of changing the issues that pressured them to come into treatment. Notably, for several years clinicians and even researchers have taken on discussions on the factors in therapy that ease change, characterised by fastidious concentration on the therapist’s role, not to mention the functioning affiliation between the patient and the therapist. However, scholars have observed that being an effective couple’s therapist requires different expertise compared to the skills that are required by being an effectual individual therapist (Kawar et al, 2018). Essentially, couples therapy may contain patently positive impacts when properly conducted, not to mention that the partners will benefit after receiving treatment that follows several principles. In this sense, evidence-based approaches remain to be key to understanding effective therapy, both in individuals and couples therapy (Wetchler & Hecker, 2014). As a matter of fact, this means that the therapy used has been tested against alternative approaches and psychologists providing this type of treatment do not stick to a single theoretical orientation.

One of the major principles of effective couples therapy include changing the opinions of the association, whereby, the therapist tries to assist the partners to view the relationship in a more intent manner (learning to stop the blame game concept). Another principle is that modification of the dysfunctional behaviour where effective couple therapists aim at changing the way that the partners conduct with one another (Sexton & Lebow, 2015). Again, the therapist have make sure that the partners do not engage in physical confrontations during the session, by conducting assessment in determining whether their clients are at risk.

Furthermore, effective couple therapists have been noted to assist their clients in bringing out the sentiments together with views that they do not feel like expressing to the other individual (decreasing emotional avoidance). All effective couple therapies focus on helping these partners to communicate more effectively. Couples and even individual therapists may in this sense provide their clients with didactic instruction so as to give them the basis for knowing the types of communication that will be effective (the clients will learn how to listen more empathically and actively) (Sexton & Lebow, 2015).

Even though therapy may not cure a condition, it can help individuals build up healthy coping skills. Determination to be active in therapy and heal is essential for meeting therapeutic goals alongside fostering a positive therapeutic relationship (Kawar et al, 2018). Finding the right therapist is also fundamental to the treatment process. Research shows that therapy may result in fewer relapses of common conditions, such as moderate depression as well as anxiety. Besides, it indicates that the positive effects of good therapy go beyond treatment.

Ethical Implications of Individual and Couples Therapists Collaboration

Arguably, research has it that couple and family therapists face more ethical challenges compared to individually oriented therapists. In a situation where one therapist is conducting both therapies, confidentiality becomes the pressing concern (Kawar et al, 2018). On the other side, when either two therapists or more are engaged in the treatment, then the most important issue remains to be the manner through which the therapists will collaborate alongside integrating the different treatments.

Confidentiality remains to be a major exertion in therapy that may occur after couples are seen one by one by the same therapist. In order to manage this challenge, these approaches have to be followed: ‘secrets will be kept, secrets will not be kept and the therapist will use their discretion’ (Wetchler & Hecker, 2014). Subtly, several scholars maintain that in case an individual therapy has already been set up, then it remains unreasonable to convert it into a couple therapy. This is mainly because the primary loyalties between the therapist and the initial patient/client make it difficult to build an effective working alliance with the partner who joins the session later. Thus, it is advised that a referral has to be made to another therapist who can start the therapy with an equal relationship with both partners.

Identifying Who the Client Is For a Marital and Family Counsellor

As earlier noted, marital as well as family therapies, vary from the above-defined individual therapies on both practical levels, and even on conceptual levels. Practically, having family members concur to come together for at least one hour for a week to focus exclusively on family matters is itself interference into the structure of the family. Initially, working with the a family, basically engrosses having the members of the family hear each other and possibly, even envisage what it feels like from the other individual’s point of view (Kawar et al, 2018). In the midst of this course of action, the family therapist keenly portrays how family constituents express themselves, characteristically changing the sharing of talk instances alongside unsettling patterns of the entire group’s communication. Arguably, this process aims at increasing what family members know about each other along with demonstrating how they might communicate about complicated therapy matters.

Conclusion

As aforementioned, in both marriage and family therapy, research has it that the unit of treatment is not only the individual, even if the interview is on a single person, but also remains to be the set of relationships imbedding the person. The goal of family therapy is to effect change not only in an individual, but also in the structure of the family and the sequences of behaviour among its members. However, confidentiality remains to be one of the major problems that may arise after couples are seen separately by the same therapist. In order to manage this challenge, these approaches have to be followed: secrets will be kept, secrets will not be kept and the therapist will use their discretion

References

Kawar, C., Coppola, J., Gangamma, R. (2018). A contextual perspective on associations between reported parental infidelity and relational ethics of the adult children. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 00, 1–10. Retrieved from, https://doi.org/10.1111/jmft.12331

Sexton, T. & Lebow, J. (2015). Handbook of Family Therapy. London: Routledge.

Wetchler, J. & Hecker, L. (2014). An Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy. London: Routledge.

[...]

Details

Pages
6
Year
2018
ISBN (eBook)
9783668731042
File size
471 KB
Language
English
Catalog Number
v429514
Institution / College
Kenyatta University
Grade
A
Tags
marital family therapy

Share

Previous

Title: Marital and Family Therapy